Monday, August 28, 2006

"Daddy"

It's over! I'm officially called "daddy" again by my son; hurray!

After about two days of consistent, kind, rebuttal each time he called me by my first name, he woke up yesterday and called me "daddy" all day long. All I did was respond "please call me daddy" each and everytime he did not.

Voila!

"Daddy"

It's over! I'm officially called "daddy" again by my son; hurray!

After about two days of consistent, kind, rebuttal each time he called me by my first name, he woke up yesterday and called me "daddy" all day long. All I did was respond "please call me daddy" each and everytime he did not.

Voila!

"Daddy"

It's over! I'm officially called "daddy" again by my son; hurray!

After about two days of consistent, kind, rebuttal each time he called me by my first name, he woke up yesterday and called me "daddy" all day long. All I did was respond "please call me daddy" each and everytime he did not.

Voila!

Monday, August 21, 2006

Daddy, my name.

A few weeks ago, my four year old son stopped calling me "daddy," and started calling me by my first name; and I don't like it one bit! It happened after his first sleep-over, which included his three cousins who just moved to town (ages ten, seven, and five). All of the cousins call me by my first name of course.

At first it was cute, but now it's driving me nuts! I never gave it much thought, but now I realize I want my kids to call me some derrivative of "dad" from now until the end of time.

I figured I'd give it a couple of weeks to see if it wore off, but, the opposite happened. He seems to be reinforced in his use of my first name. The other day I started stopping him everytime he called me by my first name. "Please call me 'daddy'" I tell him consistently (several dozen times per day). I sound like a step-father trying to convert a child to their new "daddy" as a result; ugh!

I'll persist with the proactive cajoling as it's having some affect; I can't take it anymore!

Daddy, my name.

A few weeks ago, my four year old son stopped calling me "daddy," and started calling me by my first name; and I don't like it one bit! It happened after his first sleep-over, which included his three cousins who just moved to town (ages ten, seven, and five). All of the cousins call me by my first name of course.

At first it was cute, but now it's driving me nuts! I never gave it much thought, but now I realize I want my kids to call me some derrivative of "dad" from now until the end of time.

I figured I'd give it a couple of weeks to see if it wore off, but, the opposite happened. He seems to be reinforced in his use of my first name. The other day I started stopping him everytime he called me by my first name. "Please call me 'daddy'" I tell him consistently (several dozen times per day). I sound like a step-father trying to convert a child to their new "daddy" as a result; ugh!

I'll persist with the proactive cajoling as it's having some affect; I can't take it anymore!

Daddy, my name.

A few weeks ago, my four year old son stopped calling me "daddy," and started calling me by my first name; and I don't like it one bit! It happened after his first sleep-over, which included his three cousins who just moved to town (ages ten, seven, and five). All of the cousins call me by my first name of course.

At first it was cute, but now it's driving me nuts! I never gave it much thought, but now I realize I want my kids to call me some derrivative of "dad" from now until the end of time.

I figured I'd give it a couple of weeks to see if it wore off, but, the opposite happened. He seems to be reinforced in his use of my first name. The other day I started stopping him everytime he called me by my first name. "Please call me 'daddy'" I tell him consistently (several dozen times per day). I sound like a step-father trying to convert a child to their new "daddy" as a result; ugh!

I'll persist with the proactive cajoling as it's having some affect; I can't take it anymore!

Thursday, August 10, 2006

Geeks, the web, and demographics

I just got an email from a friend who said "I read your blog. I enjoyed the bits that weren't over my head :-)". I realized I need to be blogging about non-technical stuff (I thought I already was :-)). The timing of my friend's remark coincides with a thought I had about digg.com the other day, which applies to much of the "cool stuff" on the web these days; the web is still too geeky. digg's categories are flooded with what a technically inclined demographic would "dig"; just one step removed from slashdot.org.

I fit into some technically inclined demographic, but most people don't. I worry that we're still not building solutions, sites, applications, and tools for the masses. Of course there are the social networking sites of the world, which put simple "profile" pages in the hands of the relatively non-technical (and relatively young demographic; I'm in my early 30s), but still, most people don't, or can't, even use those.

Sometimes I think we're (the technically inclined web using, and building demographic) all in some self fulfilling cycle, and it's all the same demographic kicking up all the same dust over and over again. I subscribe to the belief that in order to move the planet forward, such a demographic does need to exist (Apple Inc, first movers, geeks, etc) in all fields, but I guess I find I don't always fit a specific demographic, and I find myself, as a builder of technology and applications, just wanting to be a user sometimes; and a happy user at that.


Oh great! Another geeky blog posting. I need to get a handle on this. Maybe two separate blogs.

Geeks, the web, and demographics

I just got an email from a friend who said "I read your blog. I enjoyed the bits that weren't over my head :-)". I realized I need to be blogging about non-technical stuff (I thought I already was :-)). The timing of my friend's remark coincides with a thought I had about digg.com the other day, which applies to much of the "cool stuff" on the web these days; the web is still too geeky. digg's categories are flooded with what a technically inclined demographic would "dig"; just one step removed from slashdot.org.

I fit into some technically inclined demographic, but most people don't. I worry that we're still not building solutions, sites, applications, and tools for the masses. Of course there are the social networking sites of the world, which put simple "profile" pages in the hands of the relatively non-technical (and relatively young demographic; I'm in my early 30s), but still, most people don't, or can't, even use those.

Sometimes I think we're (the technically inclined web using, and building demographic) all in some self fulfilling cycle, and it's all the same demographic kicking up all the same dust over and over again. I subscribe to the belief that in order to move the planet forward, such a demographic does need to exist (Apple Inc, first movers, geeks, etc) in all fields, but I guess I find I don't always fit a specific demographic, and I find myself, as a builder of technology and applications, just wanting to be a user sometimes; and a happy user at that.


Oh great! Another geeky blog posting. I need to get a handle on this. Maybe two separate blogs.

Geeks, the web, and demographics

I just got an email from a friend who said "I read your blog. I enjoyed the bits that weren't over my head :-)". I realized I need to be blogging about non-technical stuff (I thought I already was :-)). The timing of my friend's remark coincides with a thought I had about digg.com the other day, which applies to much of the "cool stuff" on the web these days; the web is still too geeky. digg's categories are flooded with what a technically inclined demographic would "dig"; just one step removed from slashdot.org.

I fit into some technically inclined demographic, but most people don't. I worry that we're still not building solutions, sites, applications, and tools for the masses. Of course there are the social networking sites of the world, which put simple "profile" pages in the hands of the relatively non-technical (and relatively young demographic; I'm in my early 30s), but still, most people don't, or can't, even use those.

Sometimes I think we're (the technically inclined web using, and building demographic) all in some self fulfilling cycle, and it's all the same demographic kicking up all the same dust over and over again. I subscribe to the belief that in order to move the planet forward, such a demographic does need to exist (Apple Inc, first movers, geeks, etc) in all fields, but I guess I find I don't always fit a specific demographic, and I find myself, as a builder of technology and applications, just wanting to be a user sometimes; and a happy user at that.


Oh great! Another geeky blog posting. I need to get a handle on this. Maybe two separate blogs.

Wednesday, August 9, 2006

Ajax Design Patterns - Book Review

Ajax Design Patterns, by Michael Mahemoff, has been a pleasant surprise. Michael separates the hype and buzz from the technical reality behind building modern web applications and content.

He does a fantastic job exploring patterns that have emerged over the past few years in web development. The usual suspects are covered, but he also addresses alternatives (old and new) to the trends. His conveyance of relevant historical elements has been very useful and helps with the flow of the book.

If you like the masochism surrounding the Java vs. DHTML vs. Flash debate, there are constrasts and comparisons throughout the book, with relatively unbias perspective. As an old browser developer, of course DHTML/Ajax wins in my heart!

This book is not just a breakdown of acronyms and trendy frameworks. It has real flow and thought about the over-arching impact the techniques have on web apps. With that said, there are plenty of code examples and live online demos; its not just a high-level perspective either.

Love it!

Ajax Design Patterns - Book Review

Ajax Design Patterns, by Michael Mahemoff, has been a pleasant surprise. Michael separates the hype and buzz from the technical reality behind building modern web applications and content.

He does a fantastic job exploring patterns that have emerged over the past few years in web development. The usual suspects are covered, but he also addresses alternatives (old and new) to the trends. His conveyance of relevant historical elements has been very useful and helps with the flow of the book.

If you like the masochism surrounding the Java vs. DHTML vs. Flash debate, there are constrasts and comparisons throughout the book, with relatively unbias perspective. As an old browser developer, of course DHTML/Ajax wins in my heart!

This book is not just a breakdown of acronyms and trendy frameworks. It has real flow and thought about the over-arching impact the techniques have on web apps. With that said, there are plenty of code examples and live online demos; its not just a high-level perspective either.

Love it!

Ajax Design Patterns - Book Review

Ajax Design Patterns, by Michael Mahemoff, has been a pleasant surprise. Michael separates the hype and buzz from the technical reality behind building modern web applications and content.

He does a fantastic job exploring patterns that have emerged over the past few years in web development. The usual suspects are covered, but he also addresses alternatives (old and new) to the trends. His conveyance of relevant historical elements has been very useful and helps with the flow of the book.

If you like the masochism surrounding the Java vs. DHTML vs. Flash debate, there are constrasts and comparisons throughout the book, with relatively unbias perspective. As an old browser developer, of course DHTML/Ajax wins in my heart!

This book is not just a breakdown of acronyms and trendy frameworks. It has real flow and thought about the over-arching impact the techniques have on web apps. With that said, there are plenty of code examples and live online demos; its not just a high-level perspective either.

Love it!