Monday, December 31, 2007

Syriana & Charlie Wilson's War

If you haven't seen Syriana; see it. If you haven't seen Charlie Wilson's War; you should see it too. I saw Charlie's War yesterday, and watched Syriana for the umpteenth time again as well. I love movies that try to represent the intricacies and subtleties that define the world around us (particularly US foreign policy).

There's a scene in Syriana where some relatively low level oil exec (Danny Dalton in the movie) is being pulled out on the carpet by the DoJ as the fall guy for a questionable deal done overseas with an Eastern European country. His lawyer just got done explaining the charges against him, and he responds with...
Some trust fund prosecutor, got off-message at Yale, thinks he's gonna run this up the flagpole, make a name for himself, maybe get elected some two-bit, congressman from nowhere, with the result that Russia or China can suddenly start having, at our expense, all the advantages we enjoy here. No, I tell you. No, sir. Corruption charges! Corruption? Corruption is government intrusion into market efficiencies in the form of regulations. That's Milton Friedman. He got a goddamn Nobel Prize. We have laws against it precisely so we can get away with it. Corruption is our protection. Corruption keeps us safe and warm. Corruption is why you and I are prancing around in here instead of fighting over scraps of meat out in the streets. Corruption is why we win.
So poignant.


Wednesday, December 12, 2007

annoyed rant #3: Leopard Mail.app

I've just moved back to Mozilla Thunderbird as my mail client on all of my Leopard machines. I thought I had the IMAP, IDLE, mail delete/trash problem licked, but no luck. Deleted messages keep coming back from the dead, and I'm tired of having a full inbox as a result. Bye-bye mail.app; nice try, but you're far from a robust mail client. Long live Thunderbird.

Saturday, November 10, 2007

annoyed rant#2: Apple OSX Leopard

The day OSX Leopard came out I upgraded two of my machines to the new OS. I've blogged in the past about how insanely wonderful OSX upgrades are, however this time it has not been pretty.

Sadly, both machines have problems post upgrade. One of them can't create a Spotlight index, and I live by Spotlight, so this is a big deal. The other one hung after during an iTunes/Quicktime update. I'm sure the answer is "do a clean install," but, sorry the reason I left Microsoft OSes was so I wouldn't have to do "clean installs" and "reboot" to take care of runtime issues; please don't tell me that's where Apple has landed too.

The new Software Update facility in general illustrates a step back from the previous one. Previous OSX versions made the update process feel nice and integrated to the experience. Now you get kicked out of your session and thrown into Microsoft-like progress dialogs. Unfortunately I suspect Apple's starting to give up on identifying all run-time dependencies during update, and instead just punting (ala MS OSes) and updating the binaries once they've been unloaded from memory; whimps!

OSX distribution may just be large enough now that Apple's going to start suffering from the pains of massive distribution; namely you can't innovate as fast as you once did because you'll break things and upset users who have become accustomed to "the way things were."

I'd ask that Apple break this industry pattern by bifurcating OS development lines now rather than try to reverse mother nature's course when it comes to large-scale OS development. Let users stay on the old, un-innovative track if they want, while the more cutting edge folks can ride the innovation wave. Trying to slam the two together leads to trouble (look at the disasterous OSes that have been coming out of Microsoft for the past 12 years or so).

Don't let me down again please.

annoyed rant #1: tabbing around web forms

I navigate the web and my computer by keyboard as much as I can (mice are for kids). That means I "tab" around web pages to enter data such as usernames and passwords. There are few things in life as annoying as web pages that do not follow tab ordering standards.

Correct flow is tabbing from username field to password field, then to the remember me checkbox, then to the "submit" button. That allows me to enter my info in the fastest manner possible, with the least nuisance. I'm blown away when a web form uses some other (usually random) tab ordering; c'mon!

Tuesday, October 16, 2007

Web Strength

I'm sitting here listening to Dave Fetterman (Facebook API/Platform guy) at the Widget Summit in SF, and the strength of the overall web platform is astounding. It's actually working ;-)!

The consumer's move to such highly dynamic, large scale, heavily used, web applications, such as Facebook, puts incredible stress on the overall network components. From DBs, to CDNs, to app servers, web servers, and web browsers; incredibly the whole chain is holding up.

When we were trying to figure out how to open the client up to more dynamic interaction between application and user (ultimately landing on XMLHttpRequest), I had several doubts about things actually working at scale (e.g. performance, both server-side and client-side). Well... people have found a way. Bugs have been worked around, performance has been tuned, users are allowing more interesting information to be publicly available about them, and sandboxes (native or layered (e.g. FBML)) are providing true solutions that millions of users leverage all day, everyday.

When things were relatively static and non-interactive, everything working wasn't much of a surprise, but with so many moving parts now, it's actually pretty wild that it's all working.

Monday, October 15, 2007

True Friends...

Corny, late, two-bottles-of-Opus-One blog post.

I'm back in San Francisco for a couple of nights, staying at an old friend's pad in the city. I love this town, and the friends we left when we moved back home to Boulder. As "big" a city as it is, it's always amazing to me how small it actually is.

Whenever I'm driving around here I drive past a great memory every several blocks. From Russion Hill, to SoMa, my wife, myself, and our "Netscape crew" had so many memorable times in this fabulous city.

I miss the pace. I miss the particular personality. I miss the climate. I miss the insanely steep streets.

Fillmore St. has become a bit too trendy for my taste though.

I feel so lucky to have such heartfelt, long lasting, friendships with so many people.

Tuesday, October 9, 2007

Your Friends

I sat on a panel last week at a WICT conference in Denver, and it forced me to crystallize some thinking we've been doing at Me.dium over the past year or so. I posted those thoughts over on Me.dium's blog. If you're into the social networking space at all, give it a read.

Sunday, September 16, 2007

iPhone/iTunes sync pain

It's beyond me why the iPhone & iTunes don't support sync'ing from multiple computers. Jason Snell has a good video post that proves it is possible to do multiple machine sync; but it is brutally painful. You basically wind up deleting and re-syncing everything on your phone each time you want to update just a portion.

My music is managed/stored on one machine, and my photos and video are managed/stored on another. To make matters worse, there are times when I just want to move a single song/video/picture onto the phone (what a concept!) and I have to blow everything away (again, because of my multi machine sync needs) to get that done.

I'm surprised that the leader in sync'ing (Apple) machines/online accounts has fallen so flat when it comes to sync'ing their most important device.

Thursday, September 13, 2007

Selling out and crashing servers

The modern day version of major product success has become system crashes & overloads. Mainstream media associates high-demand and success with website failures. Today's "sold out due to high demand" equivalent is an HTTP 500 error, no server response at all, or "system down due to high-demand" messages.

As this kind of messaging was abused in the physical/traditional consumer goods world, it can easily be abused online as well. Artificially choking supply by controlling output of a video game for example, can just as easily be done on the web.

There are fine lines between honest mistakes or miscalculations in how much production should occur, and consumer manipulation/deception, or technical shortcomings.

Today, the New York Times referenced MTV's servers crashing due to high demand of a particular ring tone. The average reader doesn't know whether that's because 100 people tried to download the ringtone, or because 1,000,000 attempts were made; but they assume it was a "large" number. I happen to know that MTV's network infrastructure is in the top tier for handling scale like this, so it certainly wasn't on the 100 end of the scale, but the point remains.

These kinds of capacity scenarios remind me of traditional power grids in which infrastructure is built out to handle peak loads, even though 364 days out of a year the grid runs at an average of 10% capacity (or something like that). Massive dollars are spent to handle that one day in the year when everyone has their air conditioner on.

Thursday, August 16, 2007

iPhone, Safari, Mobile Apps, and mobile carriers.

Apple did it! Hosted mobile applications on the iPhone are powerful and useful. We've long desired a useful browser on a mobile device, but no-one has pulled it off; until now. I've been involved in many efforts to wedge a full-blown browser onto tiny solid-state devices; from AOL's Gamera project to Mozilla's minimo, but in each one of those situations tried to solve the problem by stripping down the browser to get it to fit into some horribly restrictive hardware and operating system environment. We constantly wrestled between that approach, and the "just get the hardware and operating system to look like a PC" approach; tens of millions of dollars were spent chasing the former; the wrong one.

Now I'm sure Safari has been cobbled a bit to get onto the iPhone, but for all intents and purposes it's the same as the desktop version (great CSS, JS, XML support; note, Safari is still hindered by lacking native stylesheet translation though; bizarre). This allows the end user to finally have a true web browsing experience on a small mobile device.

Apple's API for iPhone web development allows for native OS look and feel applications to be run on the iPhone via Safari. This is a great thing for end users and web app developers. It's also a joyous occasion now that the carriers have been circumvented. For years they've crippled mobile application development for selfish control reasons; finally there's an option that pulls it all together, all the while on a major US mobile carrier (ATT).

A special thanks goes out to ATT for looking the other way (purposefully or inadvertently; I don't care which it was :-) ) when it came to holding the archaic line of mobile application control. Apple and ATT broke the mold, and we'll owe it all to them five years from now when pressure has caused the other carriers and handset manufacturers to get on board.

Saturday, August 11, 2007

Complexity and web document delivery.

On the drive home from picking up our kids from my parent's house tonight, I recalled an exercise we went through at AOL a year-and-a-half ago or so. We were in the midst of an SEO fire-drill to ensure our dynamically generated web content was as crawlable and indexible as it could be. Someone asked the obviously question: "how many pages/documents do we have?" It took about three weeks to come up with an estimate that could be reasonably explained and believed; give or take roughly 100 million documents, AOL had approximately 500 million pages it could potentially respond to an HTTP request with.

While that number, whatever it actually was, has changed dramatically over the past 1.5 years, its an interesting one. In the world of highly dynamic content, the number of pages that can be served is effectively infinite. That poses some interesting scaling problems (caching "dynamic" content for example) as well as product problems (users don't want to interact with randomly generated content when they're trying to find something from a productivity standpoint (stumpleupon is entertainment for the most part)).

Drawing the line between what should be expected contextual structure (the header at the top of a Google search results page for example) and variable content is an artform.

I'm rambling... I just thought it was interesting to compare/contrast those 100 million document level product/technical challenges with Me.dium's website (relatively small). Designing a tight, compelling, intuitive product is a fascinating challenge no matter what the size.

Smaller is better!

We used the release of the new aluminum body iMac's from Apple as an excuse to finally get rid of our previous generation 24" iMac. We secretly (eventually not so secretly) hated it all along and I'm so glad to be getting the new smaller 20" iMac.

To be clear, we really liked everything about the 24" with the exception of it having a 24" screen. Staring at a 24" screen at close range is like sitting at the front row in a movie theater; you have to crane/rotate your head to see the various parts of the screen that you want to pay attention to.

I should disclose that we have the 24" iMac sitting on a narrow depth desk (24" deep) which means our heads are closer to the screen that most home setups.

I can't wait until our new 20" arrives.

As a side-note, I would have loved to have bought my new machine from the cool Apple Store at 20th Street in Boulder (keep'in it local), but they only sell standard configurations at Apple stores, and I always need to make some kind of hardware configuration change (usually more memory) on the machines I buy; annoying.

Monday, August 6, 2007

Me.dium Map Web Widget is here!

Check-out the Me.dium widget at the top-right-hand corner of my blog! Now you can see the activity and people around my blog. I've been wanting to post this on my blog for a long time; it's finally here!

You can get your own by signing up at me.dium.com.

Thursday, July 26, 2007

iPhone keyboard and laziness

Spell-checkers have given all of us a crutch when it comes to writing; we let them fill the gaps in our lacking spelling capabilities.

We've stopped memorizing the phone numbers of friends and family and have given that responsibility over to the contact lists in our cell phones.

I've found myself using yet a new crutch, the iPhone typing auto-complete/correct functionality. In order to compensate for users hitting the wrong keys on the tactile-less soft-keyboard on the iPhone, Apple dropped in some software that determines what I intended to type, even when I screw up a few letters. For example "lrtters" automatically gets converted to "letters" so I don't have to a) either type more slowly to get it right the first time, or b) have to go back and correct the mistake myself.

I can type very fast on the iPhone thanks to this auto-complete/correct feature. I've gotten intentionally lazy at hitting the correct keys because the iPhone is surprisingly good at figuring out what I intended to type anyway. Why should I bother trying to hit the right keys!?

Next step will be building in some contextual and grammatical nuances to the system can auto-correct even the most horribly butchered words.

Sunday, July 22, 2007

American cafes, service, and tipping

I don't understand why cafes, by-and-large, in the U.S. skip one of the most important parts of the experience; servers!

Cafes in Europe and Asia have folks dedicated to the cafe tables, whether indoor or out, who take your order, and bus tables. However we don't have this in the U.S. I find it a strange anomaly that we seem to have left it out of our culture.

Monday, July 16, 2007

Google doing Evil in North Carolina

I love the "do no Evil" mission statement that Google uses. It's one of those statements that's obviously too good to be true, particularly for a publicly traded company, yet they maintain it; bold.

Business Week has a great story on the process that Lenoir, N.C. and Google went through in order for Google to select Lenoir as the site for one of their $600m data centers.

Corporate Welfare (as it's often called) is one of the greatest detriments to our societal well-being in my opinion. It is basically described as a public municipality providing tax incentives (as well as others) to a private firm in order to lure that private firm to the locality, in hopes that doing so brings in revenue and jobs. As an aside, Wal-Mart is one of the worlds greatest recipients of Corporate Welfare.

Google's top-tier negotiators landed over $200m in tax breaks and other incentives from the repressed locality of Lenoir. The general issue with Corporate Welfare is the imbalance between the bottomless budgeted private firm's legal team, and an insufficiently equipped local city council. Making matters worse is that there are many municipalities that are so desperate for revenue, they'll do anything to lure firms to their region.

I'm grateful for living in Boulder, CO where Corporate Welfare has been kept to a minimum (though we're starting to show signs of weakness), but most of the U.S. isn't so lucky.

The counter argument to Corporate Welfare being a negative is that it is ultimately up to us, as citizens, to define how these deals (or lack thereof for that matter) get hashed out, however, sadly, as is often the case, the public often doesn't pay attention at the right level to counter the activity.

Google manipulated the desperation of a down-and-out community to their, significant, financial advantage. That's great news for Google and its shareholders (of which I am one via various mutual funds), but sad news for a community suffering from an already eroded tax base.

Google likely did not break any laws, but there's a line between "legal" and "right" that they crossed IMO. For all of the incentives they garnered, they skirted any commitment to guaranteeing any actual jobs for any period of time. Put another way, they can leave Lenoir in a few years, and move onto the next community that ponies up the right incentives, leaving Lenoir at the alter.

I constantly struggle with social responsibility vis a vis the capital machine that drives the planet. It's always a tough balance, but tax avoidance, just because one can, is generally shameful.

Free market economics... yea, yea, I get it (and support it). I like to have more of a conscience though.

I'll plug a consistently successful (~10% a year and never less) investment to make a point that money can be made within the confines of social responsibility; Pax World Funds.

Friday, July 6, 2007

"Making a tape"

I'm "making a tape." Well, not really, rather I'm building a playlist in iTunes, but it feels like I'm making a tape; something I used to do when I was a kid. The thing to do was build a compilation of music you liked for a certain person, or occasion, and record each song from one tape to another.

It used to take time and patience and skill as you had to sync the start/stop points on two different analog "tapes" for music recording.

I find it a deeply emotional process. Today's version of it is comprised of dragging/dropping songs I like into a playlist, which doesn't carry the same weight as investing the time in fast-forward/rewind/record to locate the right song to record to the destination tape, but it's still a heavy process.

Each song is a piece of me. Pulling a piece of myself from one place and dropping it in another has always been therapeutic.

Friday, June 29, 2007

iPhone

A friend of mine and I went to the Boulder Apple store around 5:45 and got in line. We were number 165 (out of say 250) by the time the doors opened. We were inside the store buying our iPhones by about 6:30 and we were all set about 10 minutes after that.

Incredible! The look, the feel, the behavior, the responsiveness, the screen, the design, the speed, the applications, the finger driven user interface, the stability, the network speed (over Wi-fi), are all just amazing. I'm utterly impressed.

The soft keyboard. I was a doubter from the start, but I suspect I'll be a firm believer before long. I'll miss my tactile feedback keyboard on my Treo 680, but giving it up for the insanely beautiful design of the iPhone is a no brainer. I'm finding I'm already used to the soft keyboard, and the deduction algorithm is incredibly powerful (the thing that corrects my typing mistakes). I'm just a little slower at typing on the iPhone than I am on my Treo 680, and I suspect that speed gap will close to nada in the near future.

It hooked right up to my personal IMAP email account, and my work Exchange server account.

The voicemail handling is roughly 20 years overdue. You no longer dial a retrieval number (even if it is a single button push) to get your voicemail. Instead, you manage your voicemail just like email; in parallel. You no longer listen to goofy voicemail menus (press 1 for blah blah blah), rather you just select the voicemail you want to listen to and voila, you're listening to it; what a concept.

Having fun!

Monday, June 25, 2007

Efficient water use.

We went through a major remodel roughly a year ago. In the process we changed some of our appliances in the house, winding up with dish and clothes washer models that are considered highly efficient. I knew we were doing the right thing, and each month our water bill proves it. Checkout our current water usage relative to a year ago! It's amazing how much water we save now.

Sunday, June 24, 2007

Lonely

My wife took the kids to Texas to see her father on Friday; it's Sunday night. I was really looking forward to the time alone as I haven't really had much time to myself in years. I used to travel frequently for work, and that gave me some "breaks" from homelife, but I was still always surrounded by people (restaurants, hotel lobbies, offices, cabs, etc).

I have been bowled over by the emotions that have overtaken me this weekend. The crew won't be back until tomorrow afternoon, so that will mean that they've been gone for a solid 72 hours.

Night 1: initial temporary bachelorhood high. it felt great to have some space and peace and quiet. being able to do whatever I wanted on my schedule. went to dinner with a friend.

Day 1: lost. temporary bachelorhood euphoria wore off in a hurry. busied myself with errands, and spent a fair amount of time hanging out downtown. good bike ride in the morning. plowed through the epic Gladiator. friend shuttled me around to get my car in for regular service (thank you!). decided to do a fair amount of work to keep my mind focused on something; wrote a "vision" document/statement for Me.dium. never bothered drawing the shades.

Night 2: "guy's night out." good food, good dessert, general carousing (we are so harmless it's almost funny). fell asleep watching the "making of Gladiator" disc.

Day 2: decided to plow through laundry backlog; washer and dryer have been going non-stop all day. went for a killer mountain bike ride up the canyon; one of my all-time favorite trails; nice and technical and dangerous. tea and scones with my parents in the morning; very nice. I need to do a better job staying connected to them. lots of work. visited some friends and their newborn (third child); hadn't seen them in ages.

Evening 2 (right now): heart is aching for my family. bring on the chaos and non-stop talking, crying, banging about. I want my kids in my arms. I want to see their faces. I want to hear their voices. slideshow of kids keeps going off on computer; each image sucks me in.

Anticipation of morning 3: the third morning in a row not waking up to my son asking me if I can "get up now" is going to be a doozy.

Aside from Gladiator, no television watching (we've had our TV disconnected for over a month now; feels great).

There has only been one other time in my life when I've felt this alone; doesn't feel good.

Without my family in this house, there is no life in it.

With all that said, I'm sure I'll jump at the opportunity to spend time solo again.

I'm the type of person that needs breathers and space from time to time.

Saturday, June 16, 2007

Brief family update...

Walking by an ATM booth this morning, my son asked "can we go to the money store?" I asked why he needed to go to the "money store," to which he replied "so I can then put money in my piggy bank." A quick conversation around money and earning ensued. Funny stuff.

My daughter must have said "apple juice?" 10,000 times today; painful on the ears.

Tomorrow's Father's Day; looking forward to it.

My wife's sore from physical therapy; ouch!

Saturday, June 2, 2007

Bank in Boulder!

Last week we announced $15 million in financing from Commonwealth Ventures. We are happy campers right now.

From a selfish perspective, I couldn't be more excited that the bet I placed on Me.dium several months ago continues to look strong.

From a local community standpoint, I'm ecstatic that Boulder is showing the national Venture Capital community what it is made of; there is great talent here!

From a Me.dium standpoint, this is yet another major validation point around our idea. The fact that this validation comes in the form of a financial investment, particularly of this size, means we'll be able to bring the idea to fruition and ultimately global domination.

Me.dium is building/revealing the people dimension of the internet. Being a part of Netscape early on was sea-change #1. Being a part of Me.dium today will bring sea-change #2. Something major was left out of the internet since day one; a sense of real-time community. There were attempts here and there to bake in the presence of others around you, but nothing took. One of the reasons the notion didn't stick was that everyone was just so excited about using the web, that they didn't consider the longer term ramifications of doing so alone. Now that things have matured, there is often a sense of desperation amongst our users, to be around other people online. Me.dium is removing the blinders that we've all been wearing online for a decade. Once the veil is lifted, amazing things can happen, and Me.dium's working to build those amazing things.

Saturday, May 19, 2007

Our kids.

We have two children: a 20 month old girl, and a 4.5 yr. old boy. They're both wonderful!

So far, our son is a quiet-type, and generally shy. He has a few really good friends, rather than lots of acquaintances. He loves to bike (he has a bike with training wheels, and a tag-a-long bike that mounts to an adult bike), play soccer, eat chocolate, go fishing, catch bugs, pick flowers, and talk to people he knows well (such as us). Boy oh boy does he love to talk. His vocabulary is in the hundreds I would guess.

So far, our daughter is an outspoken-type, and generally doesn't slow down for anyone or anything. She doesn't really have "friends" yet, but gets along well with others her age. She has a great laugh. She loves to "read" books (alone or with others). She likes giving kisses. She loves riding her tri-cycle, being mischievous, and always has an agenda. I'd say her vocabulary is a couple of dozen words or so.

We are so blessed to have such great children. Their hearts are filled with joy and love. They love eachother so much, and there is no greater joy in life than watching them play with one another, and help eachother out throughout the day. Big brother loves showing little sister the ropes and how to do things.

Thursday, May 17, 2007

Excessive obsession: music.

While sitting down to do some work, I fired up iTunes and dug up some music. I noticed the play count for a particular song I wanted to listen to; it was really high (in the hundreds). Seeing this reminded me of other play counts for other songs I hammer on. It also reminded me of a conversation that my wife and I have from time to time. Every now and then she points out how my music listening can be rather excessive, both in terms of just raw listening time, as well as obsession around particular songs.

As with many people, music is part of me. It motivates me, drives me, influences me, makes me happy, sad, angry, ecstatic, etc. I'm not sure what I would do without it; can humans exist without music? You get my point.

Anyway, why don't I get sick of certain songs? There are songs I have listened to literally thousands of times, and often hundreds of times in a row ("repeat one") for hours on end.

I'll never stop loving and listening to some songs, but I do wonder sometimes what that says about me.

I'm currently saturating, and blowing my mind with Heartbeats by José Gonzáles.

I'm also reminded of a question I asked my mom as a child. I vividly remember the scene. We were driving out of our neighborhood, turning left on 75th St. Something was playing on the radio and I asked "mom, when does the music run out?" Obviously she didn't get the question initially so she inquired about what I meant. "When are all the songs invented, and there are no more?" She tried to explain that music doesn't bottom out that way. I spent the afternoon churning on the question I'd asked. While eventually nature/science could exhaust all sound wave combinations, you can always change the duration of the combos which essentially gives you an infinitely variable set of music.

Sunday, May 6, 2007

Me.dium; it's a startup life.

Why did I leave my phat Technical Advisor job at AOL six months ago to join Me.dium? I took a 60% pay cut and doubled my hours in the process. I'm stressed to a degree I didn't know existed, and my general physical health has taken a nose dive (I can now catch a cold faster than you can sneeze).

I left my previous cushy job for a variety of reasons. I'm relatively young in my career, and several months ago I realized I didn't want to go through life exclusively in an advisory capacity from large company to large company. There is more to life. I'm also in love with my hometown, Boulder, CO, and I was spending way too much time on airplanes traveling around the world on business; multiple years as a United Airlines 1K member is a bad thing, not a good thing. I needed to establish some "local currency" as I call it. Boulder's a technical town with lots of great companies and smart people, but few of them were aware I existed in my previous telecommuting capacity; I was a ghost in my own town, and that needed to change. I needed to broaden my horizon and seek out new challenges, both personal and professional.

My first response to all of the above was to start a local AOL technology office to get control of my own destiny. In the process of setting it up, my sponsor (then AOL CTO Maureen Govern) was fired, and I had to slam the brakes on the whole thing. I had offer letters out to prospective team members, and got a hold of one of them just hours before he was putting in his resignation at his current employer, to tell him if he signed, he'd be signing into treacherous waters. I wasn't about to pull people out of their current, stable, work environments into the severely unstable situation at AOL. I gave AOL a couple of months to stabilize and it didn't. At that point I started hunting around for something that would change the world, and satisfy my needs in the process. Me.dium emerged, and I locked on.

I'm Me.dium's Director of Product, and I've done more in the last six months than I could have ever imagined. I've grown my threshold for pain several fold. I've re-learned how to work in an office environment (I had been telecommuting for 7 years); never thought that would have been an issue, geeze! I've also gained priceless experience in juggling several product lines in an incredibly fast moving environment, while being immersed in an Agile development shop.

I used to view the world almost exclusively through technical eyes. I liked to believe I was measuring and blending business priorities along the way, but I had no idea! Me.dium has shown me how rapidly priorities can change, and how to adjust quickly.

While bottomless budgets in large companies have their own appeal, it's too easy to get lazy. The pressure of financing, combined with marketplace forces that can crush you like a bug if you're not nimble and paying attention, has given me a lifetime of experience in just six months; again, priceless.

While working as hard as we are certainly rears its ugly head in the home-life now and then, I've been amazed at how useful a lot of what I'm learning about myself at work, has been at home. I'm much more accepting of curve-balls at home now than I ever have been.

I've learned more about who I am in the past six months than I had in the previous six years.

No pain, no gain.

Friday, May 4, 2007

Blending technology and marketing.

At a Me.dium company all-hands meeting the other day we talked about the necessity of having marketing expertise as well as technical expertise in order to get the job done. I've long believed all you need is good technology in order to succeed. While I still believe that you can "build it and they will come," regardless of marketing effectiveness, I've seen the light that can shine from solid, calculated, marketing/branding campaigns. When you plot out your look & feel (from color palette, to logo, to overall design) as well as your availability strategy, you can have tremendous impact on the marketplace.

I'm also re-evaluating my perspective on whether or not it's technology's fault, or design's fault when a user doesn't understand the value in a product. I'm the type of consumer/user that will jump over lots of hurdles and bad UI in order to leverage the power of a product or utility; if the value's there, I'll dig for it. However, most user's aren't like me, rather, they need to be led to the value via effective UI design. The value in Me.dium is phenomenal; we just need to ensure we get the technology & design right. Lot's to do.

Tuesday, May 1, 2007

Getting old

Came across the 1995 movie "Clueless" tonight. I remember when I could relate to the movie back in the mid-90's. Watching it now, I realize how old I've gotten :-). Fun movie, but kegger parties and cliques don't make sense to me anymore.

Tuesday, April 24, 2007

Fish bowls, attention streams, activity, and monitoring.

I find twitter funny on so many levels. One that jumps out at me is the attention deficit disorder that twitter perpetuates. As if we're not sliced and diced enough these days with media coming at us from so many angles on so many different topics, now we can post, and read, bite-sized chunks of whatever we feel like talking about. The "bite sized" nature of twitter separates it from traditional "blogging."

The "reality TV" of blogging has hit a new level with twitter and "nano-blogging." As the volume of twitterers increases, the relative quality of content will decrease. Just like blogs degraded the quality of editorial content at large, nano-blogging will bring it down yet another level. With that said, opening up writing to a greater number of users will obviously un-earth some true writing genius.

Anyway, what I really wanted to write about was the difference between explicit data collection, and implicit. While explicit data collection services like twitter, Flickr, and blogs capture a mind boggling amount of interesting information, they're all still rooted in a fundamentally limited, event driven form of data collection. While limited, you can still do some interesting analysis of said data; a friend of mine did some fun and interesting analysis on twitter posts.

Things really change when our lives are truly, implicitly and passively, monitored.

Imagine a necklace that captures 24 hours of audio and video. Now imagine wearing that necklace 24 hours a day, and it sync'ing each day. Upon each sync, the collected data is processed, and all of your activity (who you saw, who saw you, who you talked with, who talked with you, what you did, where you went, what you saw, etc...) is broken down, logged, and analyzed. Obviously the technology needed for this level of broad data processing doesn't exist, but it's an interesting notion.

Perhaps we won't ever get comfortable enough with sensing and monitoring to go this far. Perhaps we'll only ever be comfortable with pro-active, explicit, data sharing. I believe history is showing us otherwise though. We're seeing a conscious degradation of privacy. "Reality TV" is the tip of the ice-berg. Many people today expose much of their lives to the online world. This exposure, to date, has largely been in the form of pro-active, explicit, data sharing. As a result, it isa very limited view of our lives and activities. It is a highly editorialized view of things. As we grow tired and bored of this censored/editorialized stream of information, the next step is implicit, passive, yet controllable, data sharing.

Taking large chunks of our activity and passively collecting information about it takes today's notion of information sharing and removes the self censorship and editorialization. This gives us a true view into our activity, how we think, what we do, and so on.

Me.dium, my employer, gives users the ability to implicitly share their click-stream/attention-stream with other users (anonymously, or otherwise). As a result, your friends (or everyone) can see what you're doing as you surf the web. While entertaining, the true value is in the processing of all the data Me.dium collects. Me.dium aggregates everyone's attention-streams and correlates URLs amongst the population. The result is a "match set" of URLs that represent the sites people visit when trying to accomplish a particular task. For example, if you're looking for information about military aircraft, Me.dium can recommend the URLs that others most regularly visited, relative to the URLs you're visiting and the searches you're conducting. You can see what others did while exploring a particular topic. It's a great example of the value of processing implicitly collected data.

We also correlate users, and chat conversations that are algorithmically relevant to you as a user. We're just getting the service off the ground, and after you use it for awhile, you can't imagine browsing without it. As we tune our system to enhance the correlations, things will only get better. Me.dium is generally focused on "online" activities, but back to my "necklace" concept (its not mine, by the way, someone else talked about it years ago) the analysis and correlation that can be done with more and more data can truly start to change things.

While all the current, pro-active, explicit data collection tools and services are fun and entertaining, I'm looking forward to more productive uses of data as passive, implicit collection becomes more mainstream. We all have to work to ensure we don't wind up in some sort of "skynet"/1984 conundrum however. Any kind of sensing service/framework must build in fine grained user control.

Fish bowls, attention streams, activity, and monitoring.

I find twitter funny on so many levels. One that jumps out at me is the attention deficit disorder that twitter perpetuates. As if we're not sliced and diced enough these days with media coming at us from so many angles on so many different topics, now we can post, and read, bite-sized chunks of whatever we feel like talking about. The "bite sized" nature of twitter separates it from traditional "blogging."

The "reality TV" of blogging has hit a new level with twitter and "nano-blogging." As the volume of twitterers increases, the relative quality of content will decrease. Just like blogs degraded the quality of editorial content at large, nano-blogging will bring it down yet another level. With that said, opening up writing to a greater number of users will obviously un-earth some true writing genius.

Anyway, what I really wanted to write about was the difference between explicit data collection, and implicit. While explicit data collection services like twitter, Flickr, and blogs capture a mind boggling amount of interesting information, they're all still rooted in a fundamentally limited, event driven form of data collection. While limited, you can still do some interesting analysis of said data; a friend of mine did some fun and interesting analysis on twitter posts.

Things really change when our lives are truly, implicitly and passively, monitored.

Imagine a necklace that captures 24 hours of audio and video. Now imagine wearing that necklace 24 hours a day, and it sync'ing each day. Upon each sync, the collected data is processed, and all of your activity (who you saw, who saw you, who you talked with, who talked with you, what you did, where you went, what you saw, etc...) is broken down, logged, and analyzed. Obviously the technology needed for this level of broad data processing doesn't exist, but it's an interesting notion.

Perhaps we won't ever get comfortable enough with sensing and monitoring to go this far. Perhaps we'll only ever be comfortable with pro-active, explicit, data sharing. I believe history is showing us otherwise though. We're seeing a conscious degradation of privacy. "Reality TV" is the tip of the ice-berg. Many people today expose much of their lives to the online world. This exposure, to date, has largely been in the form of pro-active, explicit, data sharing. As a result, it isa very limited view of our lives and activities. It is a highly editorialized view of things. As we grow tired and bored of this censored/editorialized stream of information, the next step is implicit, passive, yet controllable, data sharing.

Taking large chunks of our activity and passively collecting information about it takes today's notion of information sharing and removes the self censorship and editorialization. This gives us a true view into our activity, how we think, what we do, and so on.

Me.dium, my employer, gives users the ability to implicitly share their click-stream/attention-stream with other users (anonymously, or otherwise). As a result, your friends (or everyone) can see what you're doing as you surf the web. While entertaining, the true value is in the processing of all the data Me.dium collects. Me.dium aggregates everyone's attention-streams and correlates URLs amongst the population. The result is a "match set" of URLs that represent the sites people visit when trying to accomplish a particular task. For example, if you're looking for information about military aircraft, Me.dium can recommend the URLs that others most regularly visited, relative to the URLs you're visiting and the searches you're conducting. You can see what others did while exploring a particular topic. It's a great example of the value of processing implicitly collected data.

We also correlate users, and chat conversations that are algorithmically relevant to you as a user. We're just getting the service off the ground, and after you use it for awhile, you can't imagine browsing without it. As we tune our system to enhance the correlations, things will only get better. Me.dium is generally focused on "online" activities, but back to my "necklace" concept (its not mine, by the way, someone else talked about it years ago) the analysis and correlation that can be done with more and more data can truly start to change things.

While all the current, pro-active, explicit data collection tools and services are fun and entertaining, I'm looking forward to more productive uses of data as passive, implicit collection becomes more mainstream. We all have to work to ensure we don't wind up in some sort of "skynet"/1984 conundrum however. Any kind of sensing service/framework must build in fine grained user control.

Fish bowls, attention streams, activity, and monitoring.

I find twitter funny on so many levels. One that jumps out at me is the attention deficit disorder that twitter perpetuates. As if we're not sliced and diced enough these days with media coming at us from so many angles on so many different topics, now we can post, and read, bite-sized chunks of whatever we feel like talking about. The "bite sized" nature of twitter separates it from traditional "blogging."

The "reality TV" of blogging has hit a new level with twitter and "nano-blogging." As the volume of twitterers increases, the relative quality of content will decrease. Just like blogs degraded the quality of editorial content at large, nano-blogging will bring it down yet another level. With that said, opening up writing to a greater number of users will obviously un-earth some true writing genius.

Anyway, what I really wanted to write about was the difference between explicit data collection, and implicit. While explicit data collection services like twitter, Flickr, and blogs capture a mind boggling amount of interesting information, they're all still rooted in a fundamentally limited, event driven form of data collection. While limited, you can still do some interesting analysis of said data; a friend of mine did some fun and interesting analysis on twitter posts.

Things really change when our lives are truly, implicitly and passively, monitored.

Imagine a necklace that captures 24 hours of audio and video. Now imagine wearing that necklace 24 hours a day, and it sync'ing each day. Upon each sync, the collected data is processed, and all of your activity (who you saw, who saw you, who you talked with, who talked with you, what you did, where you went, what you saw, etc...) is broken down, logged, and analyzed. Obviously the technology needed for this level of broad data processing doesn't exist, but it's an interesting notion.

Perhaps we won't ever get comfortable enough with sensing and monitoring to go this far. Perhaps we'll only ever be comfortable with pro-active, explicit, data sharing. I believe history is showing us otherwise though. We're seeing a conscious degradation of privacy. "Reality TV" is the tip of the ice-berg. Many people today expose much of their lives to the online world. This exposure, to date, has largely been in the form of pro-active, explicit, data sharing. As a result, it isa very limited view of our lives and activities. It is a highly editorialized view of things. As we grow tired and bored of this censored/editorialized stream of information, the next step is implicit, passive, yet controllable, data sharing.

Taking large chunks of our activity and passively collecting information about it takes today's notion of information sharing and removes the self censorship and editorialization. This gives us a true view into our activity, how we think, what we do, and so on.

Me.dium, my employer, gives users the ability to implicitly share their click-stream/attention-stream with other users (anonymously, or otherwise). As a result, your friends (or everyone) can see what you're doing as you surf the web. While entertaining, the true value is in the processing of all the data Me.dium collects. Me.dium aggregates everyone's attention-streams and correlates URLs amongst the population. The result is a "match set" of URLs that represent the sites people visit when trying to accomplish a particular task. For example, if you're looking for information about military aircraft, Me.dium can recommend the URLs that others most regularly visited, relative to the URLs you're visiting and the searches you're conducting. You can see what others did while exploring a particular topic. It's a great example of the value of processing implicitly collected data.

We also correlate users, and chat conversations that are algorithmically relevant to you as a user. We're just getting the service off the ground, and after you use it for awhile, you can't imagine browsing without it. As we tune our system to enhance the correlations, things will only get better. Me.dium is generally focused on "online" activities, but back to my "necklace" concept (its not mine, by the way, someone else talked about it years ago) the analysis and correlation that can be done with more and more data can truly start to change things.

While all the current, pro-active, explicit data collection tools and services are fun and entertaining, I'm looking forward to more productive uses of data as passive, implicit collection becomes more mainstream. We all have to work to ensure we don't wind up in some sort of "skynet"/1984 conundrum however. Any kind of sensing service/framework must build in fine grained user control.

Sunday, April 15, 2007

The Flu

My entire family is sick with the flu. My four year old son got it first, and is only now recovering; he's had it for six days now. I got it second, and thought I was feeling better this morning, but am bed ridden again; I've had it for three days now. My 18 month old daughter started showing symptoms 24 hours ago; about the same time my wife did.

I'm in a state of fever induced delirium at the moment; in and out for three days now. So, I don't know a) why I'm blogging about this, or b) what I'm actually saying :-).

This sucks! It's just miserable when the whole family comes down with something so nasty. Colds come and go, here and there; part of life. When true flu hits, it's a whole different ballgame. People become incapacitated. The whole operation shuts down when mom gets this sick. She's the sliver of hope for the family when we're all in such pain, and when she falters, everything goes up exponentially.

The only thing keeping me going is the thought of our immune systems becoming that much stronger as a result of going through this.

If you read this far, sorry I took you through this whining session.

The Flu

My entire family is sick with the flu. My four year old son got it first, and is only now recovering; he's had it for six days now. I got it second, and thought I was feeling better this morning, but am bed ridden again; I've had it for three days now. My 18 month old daughter started showing symptoms 24 hours ago; about the same time my wife did.

I'm in a state of fever induced delirium at the moment; in and out for three days now. So, I don't know a) why I'm blogging about this, or b) what I'm actually saying :-).

This sucks! It's just miserable when the whole family comes down with something so nasty. Colds come and go, here and there; part of life. When true flu hits, it's a whole different ballgame. People become incapacitated. The whole operation shuts down when mom gets this sick. She's the sliver of hope for the family when we're all in such pain, and when she falters, everything goes up exponentially.

The only thing keeping me going is the thought of our immune systems becoming that much stronger as a result of going through this.

If you read this far, sorry I took you through this whining session.

The Flu

My entire family is sick with the flu. My four year old son got it first, and is only now recovering; he's had it for six days now. I got it second, and thought I was feeling better this morning, but am bed ridden again; I've had it for three days now. My 18 month old daughter started showing symptoms 24 hours ago; about the same time my wife did.

I'm in a state of fever induced delirium at the moment; in and out for three days now. So, I don't know a) why I'm blogging about this, or b) what I'm actually saying :-).

This sucks! It's just miserable when the whole family comes down with something so nasty. Colds come and go, here and there; part of life. When true flu hits, it's a whole different ballgame. People become incapacitated. The whole operation shuts down when mom gets this sick. She's the sliver of hope for the family when we're all in such pain, and when she falters, everything goes up exponentially.

The only thing keeping me going is the thought of our immune systems becoming that much stronger as a result of going through this.

If you read this far, sorry I took you through this whining session.

Wednesday, April 11, 2007

data: URI scheme

Earlier today I added some DATA URIs to a blog entry I was putting together. I was in a situation in which I couldn't host the images anywhere, and they were under 250 bytes each, so I couldn't reference them via HTTP, and nor would I want all the HTTP overhead for these small images.

It had been awhile since I'd used DATA, so I tested on Firefox, Safari, then IE7. Firefox, check... Safari, check... IE7, nope!? I assumed I'd screwed something up because not supporting data: URIs made no sense at all. Sure enough, IE7 doesn't support the scheme. It's beyond me as to why. I'd put DATA into Netscape/Mozilla/Firefox long ago, so I was sad to see the lack of support in IE. What makes it particularly funny is that in lieu of rendering the image data itself, IE lays out a generic box with the text "embedded image" in it. Instead of telling me it's an embedded image, maybe just render the data instead!

data: URI scheme

Earlier today I added some DATA URIs to a blog entry I was putting together. I was in a situation in which I couldn't host the images anywhere, and they were under 250 bytes each, so I couldn't reference them via HTTP, and nor would I want all the HTTP overhead for these small images.

It had been awhile since I'd used DATA, so I tested on Firefox, Safari, then IE7. Firefox, check... Safari, check... IE7, nope!? I assumed I'd screwed something up because not supporting data: URIs made no sense at all. Sure enough, IE7 doesn't support the scheme. It's beyond me as to why. I'd put DATA into Netscape/Mozilla/Firefox long ago, so I was sad to see the lack of support in IE. What makes it particularly funny is that in lieu of rendering the image data itself, IE lays out a generic box with the text "embedded image" in it. Instead of telling me it's an embedded image, maybe just render the data instead!

data: URI scheme

Earlier today I added some DATA URIs to a blog entry I was putting together. I was in a situation in which I couldn't host the images anywhere, and they were under 250 bytes each, so I couldn't reference them via HTTP, and nor would I want all the HTTP overhead for these small images.

It had been awhile since I'd used DATA, so I tested on Firefox, Safari, then IE7. Firefox, check... Safari, check... IE7, nope!? I assumed I'd screwed something up because not supporting data: URIs made no sense at all. Sure enough, IE7 doesn't support the scheme. It's beyond me as to why. I'd put DATA into Netscape/Mozilla/Firefox long ago, so I was sad to see the lack of support in IE. What makes it particularly funny is that in lieu of rendering the image data itself, IE lays out a generic box with the text "embedded image" in it. Instead of telling me it's an embedded image, maybe just render the data instead!

Tuesday, February 13, 2007

Digital Asset Management (DAM) and the amateur photographer

I'm somewhere between an amateur photographer and a pro; trending toward the amateur side of that scale. I outgrew my point-and-shoot about six months ago, and wound up with a Canon EOS 30D DSLR. I'm loving the SLR, and am happily shooting in RAW now that disk capacity is effectively free these days. iPhoto has always been a poor photo management application in my opinion; anything beyond casual use and it falls down. A couple of years ago I moved to iView Media Pro, which has killer asset management facilities, but severely lacks even semi-serious photo editing facilities. The services it provides are elementary at best. I started a quest for its replacement and wound up with Aperture 1.5.

Along the way to Aperture, I stopped at Adobe Lightroom Public Beta 4. While thoroughly impressed with both (it's practically a coin toss), they both have a severe deficiency; lacking support for video file management. Most cameras these days shoot video, and the thought of having to manage video separately from still shots is beyond me. iView Media Pro has done this since day one, and I'm really bummed that the new wave of DAM products are leaving it out. I get that serious photogs don't mess with video necessarily, but if the DAM applications want exposure to a massive marketplace (the semi-pro/amateur photog) all they have to do is add support for video management. To be clear I'm not suggesting video editing facilities be incorporated into modern DAMs (although that would be nice), just that managing video file location alongside my pics be part of the feature set.

Easy to do, and opens the apps up to a whole new tier of consumer.

I can hear the Product Managers for Aperture and Lightroom scoffing at the suggestion that their apps be used by non-pros. Just add video file location management (and allow importing of said files) and I'd be happy; am I asking that much?

Tags:

Digital Asset Management (DAM) and the amateur photographer

I'm somewhere between an amateur photographer and a pro; trending toward the amateur side of that scale. I outgrew my point-and-shoot about six months ago, and wound up with a Canon EOS 30D DSLR. I'm loving the SLR, and am happily shooting in RAW now that disk capacity is effectively free these days. iPhoto has always been a poor photo management application in my opinion; anything beyond casual use and it falls down. A couple of years ago I moved to iView Media Pro, which has killer asset management facilities, but severely lacks even semi-serious photo editing facilities. The services it provides are elementary at best. I started a quest for its replacement and wound up with Aperture 1.5.

Along the way to Aperture, I stopped at Adobe Lightroom Public Beta 4. While thoroughly impressed with both (it's practically a coin toss), they both have a severe deficiency; lacking support for video file management. Most cameras these days shoot video, and the thought of having to manage video separately from still shots is beyond me. iView Media Pro has done this since day one, and I'm really bummed that the new wave of DAM products are leaving it out. I get that serious photogs don't mess with video necessarily, but if the DAM applications want exposure to a massive marketplace (the semi-pro/amateur photog) all they have to do is add support for video management. To be clear I'm not suggesting video editing facilities be incorporated into modern DAMs (although that would be nice), just that managing video file location alongside my pics be part of the feature set.

Easy to do, and opens the apps up to a whole new tier of consumer.

I can hear the Product Managers for Aperture and Lightroom scoffing at the suggestion that their apps be used by non-pros. Just add video file location management (and allow importing of said files) and I'd be happy; am I asking that much?

Tags:

Digital Asset Management (DAM) and the amateur photographer

I'm somewhere between an amateur photographer and a pro; trending toward the amateur side of that scale. I outgrew my point-and-shoot about six months ago, and wound up with a Canon EOS 30D DSLR. I'm loving the SLR, and am happily shooting in RAW now that disk capacity is effectively free these days. iPhoto has always been a poor photo management application in my opinion; anything beyond casual use and it falls down. A couple of years ago I moved to iView Media Pro, which has killer asset management facilities, but severely lacks even semi-serious photo editing facilities. The services it provides are elementary at best. I started a quest for its replacement and wound up with Aperture 1.5.

Along the way to Aperture, I stopped at Adobe Lightroom Public Beta 4. While thoroughly impressed with both (it's practically a coin toss), they both have a severe deficiency; lacking support for video file management. Most cameras these days shoot video, and the thought of having to manage video separately from still shots is beyond me. iView Media Pro has done this since day one, and I'm really bummed that the new wave of DAM products are leaving it out. I get that serious photogs don't mess with video necessarily, but if the DAM applications want exposure to a massive marketplace (the semi-pro/amateur photog) all they have to do is add support for video management. To be clear I'm not suggesting video editing facilities be incorporated into modern DAMs (although that would be nice), just that managing video file location alongside my pics be part of the feature set.

Easy to do, and opens the apps up to a whole new tier of consumer.

I can hear the Product Managers for Aperture and Lightroom scoffing at the suggestion that their apps be used by non-pros. Just add video file location management (and allow importing of said files) and I'd be happy; am I asking that much?

Tags:

Friday, January 12, 2007

wireless recharging is here!

I was discussing the idea of devices recharging themselves from ambient radio waves (of which there are obviously plenty) with some friends a couple of years ago. I was generally looked at with doubtful eyes and there was plenty of chuckling going on.

A friend of mine just blogged about a company doing precisely this; Powercast. Granted they're not using ambient noise (yet), but they're doing it; wireless battery recharging from up to 30' away in some specialized cases. Too cool!

wireless recharging is here!

I was discussing the idea of devices recharging themselves from ambient radio waves (of which there are obviously plenty) with some friends a couple of years ago. I was generally looked at with doubtful eyes and there was plenty of chuckling going on.

A friend of mine just blogged about a company doing precisely this; Powercast. Granted they're not using ambient noise (yet), but they're doing it; wireless battery recharging from up to 30' away in some specialized cases. Too cool!

wireless recharging is here!

I was discussing the idea of devices recharging themselves from ambient radio waves (of which there are obviously plenty) with some friends a couple of years ago. I was generally looked at with doubtful eyes and there was plenty of chuckling going on.

A friend of mine just blogged about a company doing precisely this; Powercast. Granted they're not using ambient noise (yet), but they're doing it; wireless battery recharging from up to 30' away in some specialized cases. Too cool!

Friday, January 5, 2007

me.dium nomenclature

I find it interesting how groups of people produce nomenclature specific to things the group is doing. The words that pop out of software companies are always funny to consider outside the walls of the company itself. Not that me.dium was the first to use these terms, but I thought I'd jot down some of the funny ones that have surfaced over here.

Friending (v) - the process of two users becoming friends.
Auto-Friending (v) - the process of two users automatically becoming friends in the system (e.g. userA invited userB to the system).
Friend-requesting (v) - the process of a user asking another user to be their friend.
Invitor (n) - a user who has invited another to me.dium.
Invitee (n) - a person who has been invited to me.dium.
Blue People (n) - anonymous people surfing the internet.
Yellow People (n) - friends surfing the internet.
Orange Person (n) - me surfing the internet.

Anyway, it's funny listening to a bunch of people using these words/phrases all day long.

I remember when "URL" was a new one back in the Netscape days.

me.dium nomenclature

I find it interesting how groups of people produce nomenclature specific to things the group is doing. The words that pop out of software companies are always funny to consider outside the walls of the company itself. Not that me.dium was the first to use these terms, but I thought I'd jot down some of the funny ones that have surfaced over here.

Friending (v) - the process of two users becoming friends.
Auto-Friending (v) - the process of two users automatically becoming friends in the system (e.g. userA invited userB to the system).
Friend-requesting (v) - the process of a user asking another user to be their friend.
Invitor (n) - a user who has invited another to me.dium.
Invitee (n) - a person who has been invited to me.dium.
Blue People (n) - anonymous people surfing the internet.
Yellow People (n) - friends surfing the internet.
Orange Person (n) - me surfing the internet.

Anyway, it's funny listening to a bunch of people using these words/phrases all day long.

I remember when "URL" was a new one back in the Netscape days.

me.dium nomenclature

I find it interesting how groups of people produce nomenclature specific to things the group is doing. The words that pop out of software companies are always funny to consider outside the walls of the company itself. Not that me.dium was the first to use these terms, but I thought I'd jot down some of the funny ones that have surfaced over here.

Friending (v) - the process of two users becoming friends.
Auto-Friending (v) - the process of two users automatically becoming friends in the system (e.g. userA invited userB to the system).
Friend-requesting (v) - the process of a user asking another user to be their friend.
Invitor (n) - a user who has invited another to me.dium.
Invitee (n) - a person who has been invited to me.dium.
Blue People (n) - anonymous people surfing the internet.
Yellow People (n) - friends surfing the internet.
Orange Person (n) - me surfing the internet.

Anyway, it's funny listening to a bunch of people using these words/phrases all day long.

I remember when "URL" was a new one back in the Netscape days.